Homeschooling Resources for Families in Vernon California2018-06-05T22:32:44+00:00

Homeschooling Resources in Vernon, California

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Are you one of the many of Americans looking for alternatives to the liberal Vernon public schools system you are at the right site! Great Homeschool Conventions is your premier provider of everything Homeschooling in Vernon, California. We offer the best Homeschool Curriculum, Programs, Textbooks, Materials, Lesson Plans, Resources, and some of the best conventions you’ll ever go to! If you are new homeschooling, Great Homeschool Conventions will come see you with open arms. If you are resident of Vernon, California and are interested in homeschooling, you may have a ton of questions about how homeschooling works in Vernon, California.

The number one question we get asked is What homeschool laws does California have? Given California’s political agenda might be hard to believe but yes California allows homeschooling. However, if we take a look at the number of failed attempts to shut it down we can interpret that the state of California is not a homeschooling friendly place. Nevertheless mom and dad’s who want the best education environment for their children are now choosing homeschooling more often than the state of California would like. A number of left-wing blogs have acused Great Homeschool Conventions of pushing the homeschool agenda, as with all fake news, we have never said that home school is better but if this the direction you are leaning towards we want to make sure you have the best info at your disposal.

Best Homeschooling Programs in Vernon, California

Getting high-quality home school curriculum, programs, textbooks, materials, lesson plans, and resources in Vernon, California could be a task. Possibly that is why Great Homeschool Conventions events are so popular. Here you’ll be able to mingle from renowned leading experts like John Stonestreet, Charlotte Mason Institute, and Wendy Speake as well as leading vendors of homeschooling curriculum, programs, textbooks, and lesson plans. When it’s all said and done our goal is that American kids get the most complete education available. Kids in the US have more choices than their counterparts in Canada and the United Kingdom. These are public school, private school, and home school. However, given that the US is no longer consider the top five education provider many moms and dads are looking for alternative solutions. For the great majority of stay-at-home parents private school is out of their reach making homeschooling the obvious choice. For additional details on how we can help you get started with homeschooling for your kids, please visit out our blog.

Vernon Homeschooling Programs Blog Article

How to Help Kids Distracted from their Homeschooling Curriculum Due to the Holidays

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Shiny decorations, cheery music, presents with bows—the holidays offer weeks of fun—and distraction. If your child is impulsive, distractible, or hyperactive, he or she may find it impossible to work on his or her homeschooling curriculum. As homeschooling teachers or mothers, you should always be ready to help.

But don’t grit your teeth or fume. There are many ways to keep your kids from being distracted and keep their attention to their homeschool curriculum. Below are four suggestions on how to make the holidays happier and more productive for your child.

Four Tips to Get Your Kids Focused on their Homeschooling Curriculum

  1. Make your homeschooling programs and goals reasonable.

First, make your homeschool goals reasonable. If you are expecting houseguests, extra baking, and shopping, remember that, as Elisabeth Eliot said, “God apparently thought the twenty-four-hour day was sufficient.” Ask yourself, “What can we really accomplish in our homeschool during the holidays?”

In first year of following the homeschooling curriculum, I saw that, as the holiday decorations appeared, my son’s concentration disappeared. Your child may not score in the 99th percentile for distractibility as mine did, but you too many need to adjust your goals.

Once I accepted that he would not learn much formally from early December to early January, homeschooling got easier. My main academic goal became that my son would maintain skills that month.

  1. Let the holidays enrich your homeschooling kid.

Second, let the holidays enrich your homeschool. Here are some examples:

  • We heard holiday concerts with military bands and a capella groups, listened to recordings of ancient and ethnic Christmas music, talked about it, and sang carols.
  • Look for special activities at local museums and businesses. We loved the massive model train exhibit at the US Geologic Survey’s Virginia headquarters nearby, and slipped cool geology and geography lessons into the trip.
  • We thanked our homeschool group teachers and scoutmasters by making them gifts. My son’s homemade candy was a hit. Even as a distractible 12 year old, he could do most of measuring and stirring, though I handled the pot of hot melted sugar.
  • We practiced organization and charity by sorting through his toys to find some in good condition to give to a thrift store.

I required my kids to write simple thank you notes, but to sweeten the chore, I let them choose inexpensive note cards. A friend makes custom cards by scanning her daughter’s artwork.

We read aloud even more. For literature, Dickens’ A Christmas Carol became such a favorite that, while still young, my son saved up for a hardback copy. (He prefers Quentin Blake’s illustrations because Blake plays close attention to the text.)

  1. Reduce unnecessary distractions.

Third, reduce unnecessary distractions! I saw my son’s distractibility increase when our decorations went up, so I began waiting until two weeks before Christmas to decorate. While colorful packages look lovely under a Christmas tree, their mysteries gave my young impulsive son agonies of suspense. So when he was small, I kept them out of sight until Christmas morning. Time your baking. Who can concentrate when the house smells like fresh gingerbread? I usually bake right after supper.

  1. Focus on what matters.

Finally, focus on what matters. As our family celebrates Christmas, we enjoy many traditions, but we want to emphasize the birth of Christ. So I bought a pretty plastic nativity set that small kids can use to retell the Christmas story—with their own variations, like the time my small daughter announced that the three kings were babysitting Jesus because Mary and Joseph were going out for date night.

The holidays also mean family time, so talk about being good hosts and guests. Role-play what to do when visiting Auntie-with-houseful-of-breakables or when cousins want to destroy your LEGO village. Brainstorm together how you’ll get enough exercise to keep your wiggly ones from exploding with unused energy.

The holidays also give our kids a chance to give: singing at nursing homes and gathering food for food pantries, for instance. These activities can help counter the appeals to greed that pummel us through the media, and help us count our blessings.

Setting realistic goals, working holiday activities into our homeschooling curriculum (instead of just adding them to our schedule), limiting distractions, and remembering what’s important can make the holidays easier more fun for our distractible kids. And this time of year, who isn’t distractible? So these tips help us all.

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